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Breeds

Czechoslovakian Vlcak


WORKING GROUP - courageous, protective, Suspicious

  • Weight57 pounds & up (male), 44 pounds & up (female)
  • Height25.5 inches & up (male), 23.5 inches & up (female)
  • ColorsSilver Gray, Yellow Gray
  • SheddingVery High
  • GroomingLow
  • Energy LevelVery Active
  • Barking LevelBarks When Necessary
  • Life Expectancy: 12 - 15 years

ORIGIN

The Czechoslovakian Vlcak, also referred to as the Cesky Vlcak or Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, originated in the Czech Republic where they were used as hard-working dogs and guardians. In 1955, the breed first came about from the crossing of a German Shepherd Dog with a Carpathian Wolf. They are the result of a breeding experiment for using male dogs with female wolves, instead of the commonly practiced female dogs with male wolves. This powerful new breed combines the working qualities of the wolf with the favorable qualities of the dog.

DESCRIPTION

Closely resembling the wolf, Czech Wolfdogs, hence the name, always attract a lot of attention. The breed's coat is thick, coarse, and has the silvery gray and light mask colorings of a wolf. Their eyes are narrow, short, and triangular-shaped. The ears are also narrow. The tail of the breed sits high and hangs straight down at rest, but sickles when on the move.

TEMPERAMENT & TRAINING

Adventurous and great endurance, the Czech Wolfdog is also known for being very loyal to their owners, but tend to be reserved and aloof towards strangers. Without proper training and leadership from a young age, the breed can become hard to handle as an adult. They will fit into a household with an owner who understands pack mentality, pack leadership, and wolf-hybrid personality characteristics. However, they are eager to please their owners and are not considered difficult to train as long as they have positive reinforcement and motivation from a firm owner. Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs are known to be good with children, but may be suspicious of other pets if they have not been properly socialization from puppyhood. The breed will do just fine in apartments as long as they still receive regular daily exercise, but a large, fenced yard would be ideal. 

 

 

Contact Us

Breeders Kennel Club

 P.O. Box 441 Duluth, Georgia 30096

 Phone : (470) 525-6223

 Email : info@breederskennelclub.com

 

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